Books - The Book of Robot - The Robotics Problem


28 Jan. 2018





THE ROBOTICS PROBLEM



How many robots does it take
To change a light bulb?
This is your central question.
Is it a matter
Of sufficient programming
So that the robot will know what it is to do;
Or a task of putting the necessary elements in order
Starting with a random beginning?
Is it the ability,
Both hardware and software,
To recognize varying sockets,
To fumble through the case
Of available light bulbs and not be tempted
To try one that will not fit only because
One that will fit is not present?
It could be the idea of pressure
Both holding the bulb and twisting
It into the socket. Or it could be
Cooperation: more than one robot,
Each robot understanding its own part
In the larger operation, each with its specialties:
With each enlightened robot understanding
No one robot has the entire picture.
It takes each robot doing its part,
With the working collective of robots
All fully understanding this.
There is the pure mechanical dexterity
Of one robot holding the light bulb
With no more, no less than the proper
Tension; mounting the wooden extension structure with
Each foot methodically secure; at the top
The bulb aligned with mathematical precision to the socket threads
And the robot itself tethered by three
Appendages to the ladder. At the last
The four mates, one on each wooden leg -
The fifth robot still impeccably balanced -
Lifting and ever so slowly marching
In a mutually calculated
And wirelessly communicated circle,
The aerial robot spinning with them, but
Fixed at the center of the spin.
The light bulb’s grooves will take hold.
The care between all of them will seem
More miracle than machinery,
A symphony of software and supplied structure,
A process adequately spaced into any execution register.
And then there will be light.


From “The Book of Robot”, copyright by Ken Poyner 2016.

Originally appeared in “Rattle” #37


The Book of Robot


Poetry of cyber-sentience

One robot holds the lightbulb as four coordinate the accurate turning of the ladder.  A thinking machine finds the design diagrams for a new cyber model and regards it as delicious pornography.  A domestic automaton records the minutiae of the owning family’s life, hoping to better imagine independent thought.

Ken Poyner:  multiple Pushcart Prize nominations, work in “The Watershed Review”, “Analog Science Fiction and Fact”, “Menacing Hedge”, “Asimov’s Science Fiction”, “The Alaska Quarterly Review”, “Fear of Monkeys”, more than 100 other journals and sites.  He has given readings and/or taught workshops at Bucknell University, George Washington University, The Bethesda Writers Center, and elsewhere.

Barking Moose Press, LLC, 2016:  www.barkingmoosepress.com

ISBN:  978-0692799673

$13.00 paperback, $2.99 Kindle.

Available from Amazon.com, Barnesandnoble.com, Sundial Books in Chincoteague, The Book Bin in Onley, any on-line bookseller.

Bookstore distribution through Ingram or Baker and Taylor.




Poetry of cyber-sentience

One robot holds the lightbulb as four coordinate the accurate turning of the ladder.  A thinking machine finds the design diagrams for a new cyber model and regards it as delicious pornography.  A domestic automaton records the minutiae of the owning family’s life, hoping to better imagine independent thought.

See More of Ken Poyner's work at: http://www.barkingmoosepress.com/

Ken Poyner:  multiple Pushcart Prize nominations, work in “The Watershed Review”, “Analog Science Fiction and Fact”, “Menacing Hedge”, “Asimov’s Science Fiction”, “The Alaska Quarterly Review”, “Fear of Monkeys”, more than 100 other journals and sites.  He has given readings and/or taught workshops at Bucknell University, George Washington University, The Bethesda Writers Center, and elsewhere.

© Ken Poyner / OgFOMK ArTS -- 2018 All Rights Reserved. - The Book of Robot - "The Robotics Problem"

#OgFOMK #KenPoyner #SpeculativePoetry #TheBookOfRobot #Robotics

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